OUR SHEETS

Want to know the secret to incredibly comfortable sheets?Combine noble materials with expert craftsmanship. The result? A wonderful night of sleep.


 What drives the quality of bed linen?Thread count is an important consideration-but not the whole story. The quality of the cotton, the type of weave, the feel of the fabric, and the nature of the finishing process are also key features of quality.


Percale vs. Sateen Weaves



At ACASA, we offer both percale and sateen bed linen.Sateen is a four by one-yarn weave fabric that results in a silky-soft, smooth feel and luminous sheen owing to a larger exposed surface. Sateen is more tightly woven and heavier in weight than Percale and, as a result, is warmer and softer and perfect for use all year ‘round. 

SATEEN WEAVE

PERCALE WEAVE



Percale is woven in a basic criss cross weave. Contrary to Sateen weave, Percale has a crispy and matte feel and look, like a classic button-down shirt. This weave is ideal for summer nights and for warmer sleepers.


Your choice of sheets will depend on your personal preferences: Sateen, for a silky touch and a shine, or Percale for that crisp feel on matte surface.


Percale vs. Sateen Weaves

At ACASA we offer both percale and sateen bed linen. The way the fabric was woven has a major impact on its feel.


Sateen is a four by one-yarn weave fabric resulting in a silky-soft, smooth feel and luminous sheen due to a larger exposed surface. It is more tightly woven and heavier in weight than Percale, making it warmer and softer for all year-round use.

SATEEN WEAVE


Percale is woven in a basic criss cross weave. Contrary to Sateen weave, Percale has a crispy and matte feel and look, like a classic button-down shirt. This weave is ideal for summer nights and for warmer sleepers.


Your sheets choice should depend on your personal preference for a silky touch and a shine or a crisp hand on a matte surface.

PERCALE WEAVE




COMBED COTTON

All our bed linen is made of combed cotton. Combed cotton is an extremely soft version of cotton made by specially treating the cotton fibers before they are spun into yarn. Combed cotton is also stronger, because shorter and breakable fibers have been removed through combing. In addition, the straightened fibers lie together more tightly after combing, making combed cotton thread less likely to fray and unravel over time. As a general rule, combed cotton is more expensive than conventional cotton due to additional steps in the production process.

Long and fine cotton fibers


ACASA uses long-staple fibers cotton for its bedlinen. Long-fibers provide quality weaving and incomparable softness. The longer the cotton fiber, the stronger, softer, and more durable the resulting fabric. Long fibres make for more luxurious fabric because the strands can be tightly woven. 

Long and fine cotton fibers

All our bed linen is made of combed cotton. Combed cotton is an extremely soft version of cotton made by specially treating the cotton fibers before they are spun into yarn. Combed cotton is also stronger, because shorter and breakable fibers have been removed through combing. In addition, the straightened fibers lie together more tightly after combing, making combed cotton thread less likely to fray and unravel over time. As a general rule, combed cotton is more expensive than conventional cotton due to additional steps in the production process.




The finer the cotton thread, the smoother and lighter the resulting fabric. Our cotton gets softer wash after wash to provide you with an incredible smoothness over time. Our bed linen is made of Egyptian hand-picked cotton, which preserves the purity of the fiber. Best of all, our cotton is harvested using the highest environmental, social and economic standards.


THREAD COUNT


Thread Count (TC) represents a measure of coarseness or fineness in fabrics.It is measured by counting the number of threads contained in one square inch(or square centimeter including both the length and the width threads. Forinstance, 150 lengthwise threads woven with 150 widthwise threads produce athread count of 300.

 

ACASA offering is 300 TC for sateen and 270, 400 for Percale. Some companiesoffering extremely high thread counts, count not just each thread, butindividual fibers (called plies) that make up each thread. For instance, a 300TC would be marketed as 600 TC. This causes some confusion as it misrepresentsthe actual count.

 

To be noted, the softness of your sheets depends more on the quality of thefibre - the raw materials - which is why a 270 thread-count sheet can feelsofter than a 500 thread count sheet that uses an inferior grade of cotton or atwisted yarn.

Thread count

Thread Count (TC) represents a measure of coarseness or fineness in fabrics. TC is measured by counting the number of threads contained in one square inch (or square centimeter) including both the length and the width threads. For instance, 150 lengthwise threads woven with 150 widthwise threads produce a thread count of 300. 

ACASA offer’s 300 TC for sateen and 270 and 400 for Percale. Some companies that offer extremely high thread counts count not just each thread, but individual fibers (called plies) that make up each thread. For instance, a 300 TC would be marketed as 600 TC. This form of counting causes some confusion and is arguably misleading. 

To be sure: the softness of your sheets depends above all on the quality of the fibre - the raw materials - which is why a 270 thread-count sheet that uses high quality fibre can feel softer than a 500-thread count sheet that uses an inferior grade of cotton or a twisted yarn.

 

  Simple-ply yarn

In the world of textiles, plying is the process that is used to create a strong, balanced yarn. Plying is done by taking two or more strands of twisted yarn and aligning them together in the direction opposite from the one they were spun. When just the right amount of twist is done, plying creates a balanced yarn, one that has no tendency to twist upon itself. 


For ACASA bed linen, we use only single-ply yarn made up of one long thread. Single-ply yarn can only be spun from long-staple cotton, and results in light, soft, and long-lasting sheets. Multi-ply yarn is usually associated with low quality, shorter cotton threads that aren’t strong enough to be used in single-ply products.